Tag Archive | Breastfeeding

Why Children Should Witness Breastfeeding in Public ~ Nursing Freedom

http://www.nursingfreedom.org/2010/08/why-children-should-witness.html

A child’s life is made up of moments. Children learn by observing and interacting with their world, and every moment adds up to form the basis for the values, beliefs, habits, and memories which will carry them into adulthood. This seems obvious, but what does it have to do with breastfeeding?

Well, what happens if children never witnesses breastfeeding? What if they spend their entire childhood seeing only bottle feeding, both in the media and among the people they interact with? What if a young girl or boy grows up surrounded by sexualized images of breasts but never, or only rarely, witnesses the normal, natural act of breastfeeding a baby? There are some fortunate children who witness their mother breastfeeding a younger sibling, but one look at the breastfeeding rates in the US today will tell you that they are likely not seeing the nursing relationship last for very long.

I am fortunate. My own experience with nursing in public has been wonderful, despite having never seen a woman breastfeed up close and in person until pregnant and attending an LLL meeting. My husband is supportive, I don’t work outside the home, and I have never been directly criticized or asked to cover up. My son is almost 18 months and still nurses quite frequently – some days more than when he was an infant! I nurse him in public anywhere and everywhere he wants to. I’ve noticed that as he’s growing older and finding his independence, he needs to come back to me when overwhelmed with his environment, to calm and center himself by nursing. This means that some days he tends to nurse in public more than he does at home. I can’t imagine what life would be like if I was uncomfortable with nursing in public. We have nursed at a wedding, a funeral, a graduation, birthday parties, on airplanes, trains, buses, subways, parks, playgrounds, museums, cafes, restaurants, even on amusement park rides. Everywhere I go, he goes, and so nursing goes.

Recently, we traveled to Scandinavia. In the three weeks we spent in Sweden and Denmark, I observed three women nursing babies, uncovered, at the table at restaurants, and many others nursing at parks and playgrounds. In my entire life living in the US, I can recall seeing only one woman nursing at a restaurant, and very few in other public places aside from breastfeeding gatherings and LLL meetings. The cultural contrast between Scandinavia and the US was incredible to take in, particularly in how I observed children reacting to the sight of breastfeeding. In Scandinavia, I never once saw a child or a child’s parents react with alarm, disgust, shame, or even slight concern when they witnessed myself or other women breastfeeding in public. On a train in Denmark, a group of 15+ teenage boys boarded while I was nursing my son. One sat right next to me and offered a kind smile. Another boy noticed and looked for a second but didn’t behave awkwardly at all. The rest likely glanced my way at some point (they were only a few feet away from me), but none acted like it was a big deal – probably because in Denmark, as well as in Sweden, breastfeeding rates are much better than in the US, and the sexualization of breasts is much less profound.

In contrast, here in the Northeast US, I have had several experiences with nursing around groups of pre-teen and teenage boys. What has happened every time was this: one boy noticed, and immediately a storm of whispers, giggles, double-takes, stares and/or shyly averted eyes commenced. “Her boob is out! Pass it on!” While somewhat amusing, it’s terribly sad. The reason these boys are so giddy and awkward around the sight of my nursing breast is likely because women’s breasts are viewed as almost strictly sexual in the United States. Nipples are powerful enough to trigger massive media uproar and federal investigation when exposed in a “family setting.” Yet we flaunt breasts during primetime television broadcasts. Breasts sell products and ideas, and are widely fetishized. I take no issue with breasts being sexual, but they also need to be seen as nurturing. I believe the view of breasts as solely sexual is one of the primary reasons that so many people seem to think breastfeeding should be done in private, and are against nursing in public, especially uncovered. Breasts are too powerful and too sexualized for many people – that view can trigger a sort of cognitive dissonance when witnessing a sex object being used by a child for nurturance and sustenance. When breasts are seen only in a sexual way, it’s no surprise that it could be confusing and disturbing to see a baby’s (or worse: a young child’s) head in the way of an observer’s mental sexual objectification. It’s time that our society re-conceptualizes breasts as both sexual and nurturing, and stops shaming women for using their breasts in either manner.

I believe that nursing in public is one of the best things a breastfeeding mother can do for society as a whole – not just to give her own child a healthy start, but to give other people’s children the opportunity to see mothering and nurturance at the breast as normal, healthy, and enjoyable. Nursing in public helps re-normalize breastfeeding as the biologically optimal means of feeding a baby, and of comforting and nurturing a toddler or young child who no longer needs breastmilk for nutrition. It is appalling to hear news stories or personal anecdotes about breastfeeding mothers being asked to cover up when they nurse around children not their own. The only real reason people ask a woman to hide breastfeeding when she’s around children is if the person doing the asking views breasts as sexual or the act of breastfeeding as too intimate for public view. Yet, breastfeeding is not at all sexual. Why do some people see breastfeeding in that light? Perhaps because they haven’t seen enoughbreastfeeding to internalize how normal and natural it is. To convey to children that they should not be witnessing breastfeeding makes it a taboo, a secret, something dirty or shameful that must be done in private – like using the bathroom or engaging in sexual activity, both of which are sometimes ignorantly equated with breastfeeding. Children who receive that message enough may grow up to be adults who don’t want to breastfeed, who have to overcome psychological hang-ups in order to breastfeed, who shame or scold women who do breastfeed, or who discourage friends and family members from breastfeeding. Those attitudes harm children and women and society as a whole.

One of the easiest ways to reach children is on an individual level, by simply being visible to them and engaging them, answering their questions if so presented. A young girl who saw me nursing my son when he was an infant looked on in pure astonishment and asked me “what are you doing to him?!” as though I was hurting my baby. I simply smiled and told her I was breastfeeding him, that this was how he ate. It seemed as though she had never before seen a woman nursing a baby prior to observing me. I hope that her interaction with me provided her with a positive memory, and hopefully a question or five to ask her parents. Imagine if she saw another woman nursing in public the next week and every week after that. Eventually, it would cease to be a source of astonishment for that little girl and would become just a simple fact of mothering.

To change our culture’s perception of nursing in public and improve social support of breastfeeding as a whole, we need to start with children. We need to make nursing in public so boring, so quotidian, that it garners no more of a glance or second thought than seeing someone drinking a coffee or hugging a friend in public. We need to allow and encourage children of all ages to regularly and repeatedly witness the beautiful and natural act of breastfeeding, so they will grow up thinking nothing much of it, simply expecting it to be a part of their own parenting lives.

“Common sense is the collection of prejudices acquired by age eighteen.” – Albert Einstein

Our Birth Plan, Edited Edition

I have slightly edited our birth plan because when I transferred it from my original post to Word, it came to a little over two pages, and I didn’t want to print out that much paper or have too many pages for nurses and delivery staff to keep track of. So here is a slightly edited version which comes to about a page and a half on a Word document.

Hello to the staff at Sutter Memorial Birthing Center!

We are the S family expecting our second baby girl who we are naming Vera. We are very excited that you will be helping and sharing her birth with us. Please let us help you to get to know us better by reading our wishes for this birth. We are planning an un-medicated vaginal birth, our second one! We know that, with your help and the absence of complications, that this will be an amazing natural birth. We believe that flexibility and having an open mind for all our parts is key. We would like to ask to be attended by staff who the most enthusiastic about helping with an un-medicated birth. We look forward to getting your support and your advice throughout our experience. Our birth team consists of myself, my husband, our doula Teresa and my grandma Betty.

Labor

  • I am happy to move around and change positions for more comfort and to speed up labor.
  • I would like the room to remain dim with no bright lights during labor and after delivery.
  • I would like to sip water or coconut water throughout labor to prevent dehydration.
  • In the absence of complications I would like minimal interventions such as pain medication, vaginal exams, internal monitoring and IV.
  • Please help me by not asking if I want pain medications since myself or one of my birth team members will let you know if I change my mind.
  •  If interventions become necessary, please allow us time to review all the risks and benefits with you.
  • I would like to forgo continuous monitoring unless it becomes necessary.

Delivery

  • Please help me to try a variety of positions including the squatting bar.
  • I would like to push only when I feel the urge and would like direction in my low grunting and vocal noises.
  • I would prefer not to have an episiotomy unless it is absolutely necessary to hasten Vera’s delivery
  • If possible my husband would like to help deliver or catch Vera.

After Delivery

  • I want my daughter placed on my stomach/chest immediately after delivery to allow us to bond.
  • We do not want the umbilical cord to be cut until it has stopped pulsating and until Vera has received all of the blood from the placenta. My husband would like to cut the cord when the time comes.
  • We do not want Vera to receive the Vitamin K Shot/injection
  • We do not want Vera to receive Erythromycin eye ointment
  • Please delay all noncritical measures: We would like all non-emergency routines to be postponed from being administered to Vera until at least 1 to 2 hours after her birth so we can immediately bond with her and begin breastfeeding.
  • If my daughter must be taken from me to receive medical treatment, my husband will accompany her at all times.
  • We want to request a private room whenever one is available.
  • Please do not announce our daughter’s birth to family members who may be waiting outside, we will let them know after Vera has breastfed.

Placenta

  • We want to keep the placenta, please do not discard it
  • We prefer to allow the placenta to be delivered without assistance, pulling, or medication.
  • We plan on encapsulating the placenta and have brought a cooler filled with ice for the placenta to remain in until transfer by us.

Breastfeeding

  • I would like to avoid all artificial nipples including pacifiers and bottles.
  • If Vera and I have any trouble with breastfeeding I welcome your guidance and support to help us along with our latching and with any other problems we may have.
  • This will be my second time breastfeeding a newborn and I plan to nurse on demand and exclusively.

In case of Cesarean: I would like my husband present at all times, as well as my doula if the anesthesiologist allows it. As long as we are both stable, please facilitate a minimal separation between Vera and I so I can breastfeed and bond as soon as possible.

Thank You!

We would like to thank you ahead of time for your help and participation in our un-medicated birth of our baby girl Vera! We understand that in the event of an emergency flexibility is required, and we will discuss necessary changes to our birth plan with the hospital staff and medical team. Thank you for helping us make the birth of baby Vera unique and special.

Vitamin K at Birth: To Inject or Not

A baby having milk from a bottle.

A baby having milk from a bottle. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Vitamin K at Birth: To Inject or Not

Posted By Dr. Ben Kim

Before my wife gave birth to our first child, our primary midwife asked us to think about whether we wanted our child to receive a vitamin K shot after he was born or not.

Vitamin K shots are routinely administered to newborn babies because 1.8 out of every 100,000 babies who do not receive vitamin K injections suffer permanent injury or death due to uncontrolled bleeding in the brain that may be the result of having extremely low levels of vitamin K in their systems.

Our instinct was to decline the shot for our baby, but after our midwife gave the vitamin K shot a strong endorsement due to an experience she had of seeing an non-injected baby die from intracranial bleeding, we felt enough uncertainty to go with her recommendation.

Most fortunately, our son had no problems with his injection and is thriving as he approaches 22 months of age.

In preparing to welcome our second child this coming summer, we recently decided to do some more research into the pros and cons of giving vitamin K shots to newborns. After reading through several papers and discussing the matter over many days, we decided that for our second child, we will decline the vitamin K shot.

After reading about some of the potential problems that can result from administering vitamin K shots to newborns, we decided that we feel more comfortable having my wife each plenty of vitamin K-rich foods late in her pregnancy and while she nurses our baby.

What follows is the most balanced and informative article on this topic that we encountered during our research. If this topic is of interest to you, please be sure to read the entire article that follows. Do not be alarmed when you first encounter the references to vitamin K shots being linked with an increased risk of developing cancer. When you get to the section that is subtitled “The Numbers,” you will see that the statistics do not clearly favor giving or not giving a vitamin K shot to newborns.

If you are expecting to have a baby, we hope that you find this information to be useful as you make a decision that feels right for your unique circumstances.

***

Reprinted from the International Chiropractic Pediatric Association Newsletter, September/October 2002 Issue

UPDATED May 19, 2004

by Linda Folden Palmer, DC (http://babyreference.com)

Newborn infants routinely receive a vitamin K shot after birth in order to prevent (or slow) a rare problem of bleeding into the brain weeks after birth. Vitamin K promotes blood clotting. The fetus has low levels of vitamin K as well as other factors needed in clotting. The body maintains these levels very precisely.(1) Supplementation of vitamin K to the pregnant mother does not change the K status of the fetus, confirming the importance of its specific levels.

Toward the end of gestation, the fetus begins developing some of the other clotting factors, developing two key factors just before term birth.(2) It has recently been shown that this tight regulation of vitamin K levels helps control the rate of rapid cell division during fetal development. Apparently, high levels of vitamin K can allow cell division to get out of hand, leading to cancer.

What’s the Concern?

The problem of bleeding into the brain occurs mainly from 3 to 7 weeks after birth in just over 5 out of 100,000 births (without vitamin K injections); 90% of those cases are breastfed infants (3) because formulas are supplemented with unnaturally high levels of vitamin K. Forty percent of these infants suffer permanent brain damage or death.

The cause of this bleeding trauma is generally liver disease that has not been detected until the bleeding occurs. Several liver problems can reduce the liver’s ability to make blood-clotting factors out of vitamin K; therefore extra K helps this situation. Infants exposed to drugs or alcohol through any means are especially at risk, and those from mothers on anti-epileptic medications are at very high risk and need special attention.

Such complications reduce the effectiveness of vitamin K, and in these cases, a higher level of available K could prevent the tragic intracranial bleeding. This rare bleeding disorder has been found to be highly preventable by a large-dose injection of vitamin K at birth.

The downside of this practice however is a possibly 80% increased risk of developing childhood leukemia. While a few studies have refuted this suggestion, several tightly controlled studies have shown this correlation to be most likely.(4,5) The most current analysis of six different studies suggests it is a 10 or 20% increased risk. This is still a significant number of avoidable cancers.(6)

Apparently the cell division that continues to be quite rapid after birth continues to depend on precise amounts of vitamin K to proceed at the proper rate. Introduction of levels that are 20,000 times the newborn level, the amount usually injected, can have devastating consequences.

The Newborn’s Diet

Nursing raises the infant’s vitamin K levels very gradually after birth so that no de-regulation occurs that would encourage leukemia development. Additionally, the clotting system of the healthy newborn is well planned, and healthy breastfed infants do not suffer bleeding complications, even without any supplementation.(7)

While breastfed infants demonstrate lower blood levels of vitamin K than the “recommended” amount, they show no signs of vitamin K deficiency (leading one to wonder where the “recommended” level for infants came from). But with vitamin K injections at birth, harmful consequences of some rare disorders can be averted.

Infant formulas are supplemented with high levels of vitamin K, generally sufficient to prevent intracranial bleeding in the case of a liver disorder and in some other rare bleeding disorders. Although formula feeding is seen to increase overall childhood cancer rates by 80%, this is likely not related to the added vitamin K.

The Numbers

Extracting data from available literature reveals that there are 1.5 extra cases of leukemia per 100,000 children due to vitamin K injections, and 1.8 more permanent injuries or deaths per 100,000 due to brain bleeding without injections. Adding the risk of infection or damage from the injections, including a local skin disease called “scleroderma” that is seen rarely with K injections (8), and even adding the possibility of healthy survival from leukemia, the scales remain tipped toward breastfed infants receiving a prophylactic vitamin K supplementation. However, there are better options than the .5 or 1 milligram injections typically given to newborns.

A Better Solution

The breastfed infant can be supplemented with several low oral doses of liquid vitamin K9 (possibly 200 micrograms per week for 5 weeks, totaling 1 milligram, even more gradual introduction may be better). Alternatively, the nursing mother can take vitamin K supplements daily or twice weekly for 10 weeks. (Supplementation of the pregnant mother does not alter fetal levels but supplementation of the nursing mother does increase breast milk and infant levels.)

Either of these provides a much safer rate of vitamin K supplementation. Maternal supplementation of 2.5 mg per day, recommended by one author, provides a higher level of vitamin K through breast milk than does formula (10), and may be much more than necessary.

Formula provides 10 times the U.S. recommended daily allowance,” and this RDA is about 2 times the level in unsupplemented human milk. One milligram per day for 10 weeks for mother provides a cumulative extra 1 milligram to her infant over the important period and seems reasonable. Neither mother nor infant require supplementation if the infant is injected at birth. (11)

The Bottom Line

There is no overwhelming reason to discontinue this routine prophylactic injection for breastfed infants. Providing information about alternatives to allow informed parents to refuse would be reasonable. These parents may then decide to provide some gradual supplementation, or, for an entirely healthy term infant, they may simply provide diligent watchfulness for any signs of jaundice (yellowing of eyes or skin) or easy bleeding.

There appears to be no harm in supplementing this vitamin in a gradual manner however. Currently, injections are provided to infants intended for formula feeding as well, although there appears to be no need as formula provides good gradual supplementation. Discontinuing routine injections for this group alone could reduce cases of leukemia.

One more curious look at childhood leukemia is the finding that when any nation lowers its rate of infant deaths, their rate of childhood leukemia increases.(12) Vitamin K injections may be responsible for some part of this number, but other factors are surely involved, about which we can only speculate.

Note from Ben Kim: To learn more about Dr. Linda Folden Palmer and her work, please visit: BabyReference.com.

Notes

1. L.G. Israels et al., “The riddle of vitamin K1 deficit in the newborn,” Semin Perinatol 21, no. 1 (Feb 1997): 90-6.

2. P. Reverdiau-Moalic et al., “Evolution of blood coagulation activators and inhibitors in the healthy human fetus,” Blood (France) 88, no. 3 (Aug 1996): 900-6.

3. A.H. Sutor et al., “Late form of vitamin K deficiency bleeding in Germany,” Klin Padiatr (Germany) 207, no. 3 (May-Jun 1995): 89-97.

4. L. Parker et al., “Neonatal vitamin K administration and childhood cancer in the north of England: retrospective case-control study,” BMJ (England) 316, no. 7126 (Jan 1998): 189-93.

5. S.J. Passmore et al., “Case-control studies of relation between childhood cancer and neonatal vitamin K administration,” BMJ (England) 316, no. 7126 (Jan 1998): 178-84.

6. E. Roman et al., “Vitamin K and childhood cancer: analysis of individual patient data from six case-control studies,” Br J Cancer (England) 86, no. 1 (Jan 2002): 63-9.

7. M. Andrew, “The relevance of developmental hemostasis to hemorrhagic disorders of newborns,” Semin Perinatol 21, no. 1 (Feb 1997): 70-85.

8. E. Bourrat et al., “[Scleroderma-like patch on the thigh in infants after vitamin K injection at birth: six observations],” Ann Dermatol Venereol (France) 123, no. 10 (1996): 634-8.

9. A.H. Sutor, “Vitamin K deficiency bleeding in infants and children,” Semin Thromb Hemost (Germany) 21, no. 3 (1995): 317-29.

10. S. Bolisetty, “Vitamin K in preterm breast milk with maternal supplementation,” Acta Paediatr (Australia) 87, no. 9 (Sep 1998): 960-2.

11. K. Hogenbirk et al., “The effect of formula versus breast feeding and exogenous vitamin K1 supplementation on circulating levels of vitamin K1 and vitamin K-dependent clotting factors in newborns,” Eur J Pediatr 152, no. 1 (Jan 1993): 72-4.

12. A. Stewart, “Etiology of childhood leukemia: a possible alternative to the Greaves hypothesis,” Leuk Res (England) 14, nos. 11-12 (1990): 937-9.

Me and PPD (Postpartum Depression)

1

My daughter and I during Thanksgiving at 13 months postpartum, loving life!

 

When I was a kid I had severe anxiety and some insomnia off and on until the end of high school. I never knew that it was a type of depression until I was in college and I was reading about the different types. Nobody knew about any of it except my parents who I once disclosed my horrifying fears to, but they had no idea what was going on. My dad replied that if it kept happening that they would take me to a priest, so that shows how much knowledge they had about anxiety and depression in children. Sometimes my fears and anxiety would be paralyzing at night and I would lie awake practically until morning. My mom took me to talk to the school counselor in grade school and he talked about how I could imagine that noises I heard at night were just the cat outside or the wind or whatever, but I only saw him that one time and he didn’t help me. My mom doesn’t even remember any of this when I talk about it now, except for the fact that I could never spend the night at any of my friend’s houses as a kid, and if I did I would never sleep.

So when I became pregnant for the first time I knew I was at risk for PPD. My anxiety started up again toward the end of my pregnancy and I recognized the same fears and emotions I had as a child. The worst of it was after I delivered my daughter, it was very scary at night, so scary that I can’t disclose my thoughts or feelings that were happening to anyone except the therapists and support group that I was seeing. To this day my husband doesn’t believe that I even had PPD, and I think it is because I act so normal on the outside while I deal with everything on the inside alone, just like I had done as a kid. I never took medication for it because the worst of it ended after about the first month or so, but I wasn’t completely normal again until about nine months after I had delivered my daughter. I don’t trust those meds and all of the scary side-effects they can have. In the end PPD became my number one fear, really my only fear, about having children.

Right now I am researching ways to prevent PPD. Getting a lot of sleep, encapsulating my placenta, and keeping my diet healthy are what I plan on doing. I also need to get in touch with a good therapist and support group which helped me so greatly before. Even joining a mother’s group or breastfeeding group will help so much. I was a part of a breastfeeding group led by a wonderful RN when I was living in the bay area. She had also experienced PPD and we were able to talk and share thoughts and fears, which helped me so much. You just want to know that you are not going crazy and that you are not alone and what you are going through is normal for many mothers, at least that is what I needed.

I have had some down days and some mild anxiety up to this point, but I am worried that it will get worse. However I do not expect it to be as bad as it was the first time. I have a lot more good things going for me now: I no longer live with my intrusive mother in law, and I live just minutes away from my family instead of hours. I wish my husband could understand this about me, but it’s difficult for him for some reason. I am praying that the placenta capsules will do wonders for me, and I plan on writing a post about the benefits the capsules have for mothers and their babies. Meanwhile I am doing well, I have emotional days, but overall I am very happy and loving my life and I feel extremely blessed by what the universe and what God has given me.

My Birth Plan

Hello to the staff at Sutter Memorial Birthing Center!

We are the S family expecting our second baby girl who we are naming Vera. We are very excited that you will be helping and sharing her birth with us. Please let us help you to get to know us better by reading our wishes for this birth which we have summed up for you here. We are planning an unmedicated vaginal birth, our second one! We know that, with your help and the absence of complications, that this will be an amazing natural birth. We believe that flexibility and having an open mind for all our parts is key. We would like to ask to be attended by staff who are best capable at and who are the most excited about helping with an unmedicated birth. We look forward to getting your support and your advice throughout our experience. Our birth team consists of myself, my husband, our doula Teresa and my sister Kristalle.

Labor

I am happy to move around and change positions for more comfort and to speed up labor.

I would like the room to remain dim with no bright lights during labor and after delivery.

I would like to sip water or coconut water throughout labor to prevent dehydration.

In the absence of complications I would like minimal interventions such as pain medication, vaginal exams, internal monitoring and IV.

Please help me by not asking if I want pain medications since I or one of my birth team members will let you know if I change my mind. If interventions become necessary, please allow us time to review all the risks and benefits with you.

I would like to forgo continuous monitoring unless it becomes necessary.

Episiotomy

I would prefer not to have an episiotomy unless it is absolutely necessary to hasten Vera’s delivery.

Delivery

Please help me to try a variety of positions including the squatting bar.

I would like to push only when I feel the urge and would like direction in my low grunting and vocal noises.

If possible my husband would like to help deliver or catch Vera.

After Delivery

I want my daughter placed on my stomach/chest immediately after delivery to allow us to bond.

We do not want the umbilical cord to be cut until it has stopped pulsating and until Vera has received all of the blood from the placenta. My husband would like to cut the cord when the time comes.

Please delay all noncritical measures: We would like all non-emergency routines to be postponed from being administered to Vera until at least 1 to 2 hours after her birth so we can immediately bond with her and begin breastfeeding.

We do not want Vera to receive the Vitamin K Shot/injection

We do not want Vera to receive Erythromycin eye ointment

If my daughter must be taken from me to receive medical treatment, my husband will accompany her at all times.

We want to request a private room whenever one is available.

Please do not announce our daughter’s birth to family members who may be waiting outside, we will let them know after Vera has breastfed.

Placenta

We want to keep the placenta, please do not discard it

We prefer to allow the placenta to be delivered without assistance, pulling, or medication.

We plan on encapsulating the placenta and have brought a cooler filled with ice for the placenta to remain in until transfer by us.

Breastfeeding

I would like to avoid all artificial nipples including pacifiers and bottles.

If Vera and I have any trouble with breastfeeding I welcome your guidance and support to help us along with our latching and with any other problems we may have.

This will be my second time breastfeeding a newborn and I plan to nurse on demand and exclusively.

In case of Cesarean

I would like my husband present at all times, as well as my doula if the anesthesiologist allows it.

As long as we are both stable, please facilitate a minimal separation between Vera and I so I can breastfeed and bond as soon as possible.

Thank You

We would like to thank you ahead of time for your help and participation in our unmedicated birth of our baby girl Vera! We understand that in the event of an emergency flexibility is required, and we will discuss necessary changes to our birth plan with the hospital staff and medical team. Thank you for helping us make the birth of baby Vera unique and special.

Normalizing Breastfeeding For Older Children Will Help Our Society View’s of Breastfeeding and of Women

breastfeeding

breastfeeding (Photo credit: sdminor81)

I just saw a post on Babycenter by a woman who is concerned about breastfeeding around her ten year old son. Some women had some great comments, such as one woman who said:

“I think it’s so important to nurse our babies in front of our other kids, especially boys. It normalizes breastfeeding, and teaches them a healthy attitude about what breasts are for. I was 17, and my little brother was 11, when my parents had our little brother. My Mom didn’t think twice about breastfeeding in front of us. My brother was never uncomfortable about it, and to this day doesn’t bat an eye about women breastfeeding their babies. He is 24 now, and so respectful of women who BF, and I really think that it is because of the experience of watching my Mom BF our brother that he has such a healthy attitude towards it.I think if you try to be discreet, or hide it all together, that it really sends the wrong message. Any discomfort he or you may feel in the beginning will be very short lived. It will become just a normal part of everyday life. I would just be as nonchalant about it as possible. The more comfortable you are, the more comfortable he will be.”

Another woman said that if you normalize breastfeeding for older children, it becomes a normal and natural thing instead of a weird gross thing, which unfortunately is the majority of our society’s view on breastfeeding.

I remember one time a guy I was dating asked me why he loved breasts so much, and I said it was probably because breasts are what he needed to feed his future babies, and he agreed because, well, it’s the truth! The reasons men and women are attracted to each other are all linked to fertility. Not feeding our babies the best nourishment in the world because we only view breasts as sexual objects is a major crime! Especially because the reason you are attracted to them in the first place is because they are a sign of fertility and will feed your babies!

I intend to add more research to this, but I really believe that if we make breastfeeding a normal and natural thing for older kids that our children will have more respect for themselves and for each other. Men would have more respect for women when they can view breasts as something more than sexual objects, and woman will also stop degrading themselves and feeling so uncomfortable about their bodies.

How can I wean my toddler from breastfeeding? | BabyCenter

 

English: Breastfeeding an infant Português: Um...

English: Breastfeeding an infant Português: Um recém-nascido em aleitamento (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

This sounds like my daughter, I am struggling to wean her right now. I am going to try vinegar on the breasts today!

 

My daughter is 21 months old and I have just successfully weaned her off the breast! I tried weaning her little by little, but she was not taking it. She would get extremely upset.I felt really bad, so I stopped. Then about 3 weeks after I read something about putting garlic in oil and let it sit for a while, after that rub the oil on the nipples.I did that and for my surprise my daughter DID NOT wanted to breastfeed anymore.It took about 5 days of she asking for it and I’m telling her that mommy’s breast was dirty…she took it…for the record, my daughter had NEVER slept through the night, we co-sleep and she used to make my nipples as her pacifier.In the first 4 days, bed time was terrible, I mean, she wouldn’t nap at all, and at night she cried so much,then she would fall asleep and wake up after 1 hour….after 5 days she has been sleeping through the night and has NOT ASKED for it anymore! She’s been eating better than ever as well! Iam very happy and sure I did the right thing!

 

posted 03/30/2009 by a BabyCenter Member

 

via How can I wean my toddler from breastfeeding? | BabyCenter.

 

This may sound cruel, but I was desperate. I was exhausted because my 20 month old stil woke up 2-3 x a night and I was pregnant. I needed rest and my toddler was a little over weight anyway due to she ate everything and nursed a lot. Anyway, I put a little vinegar on my nipples and she said “yucky”. She said it was bad and didn’t want it anymore. She asked for it a couple other times, but I reminded her it was yucky and she agreed. I did have to let her try once more, but now she is fine and sleeping alot better! Thank God! Hope you find what works for you.

 

posted 07/27/2009 by CHRISTY0830